Restoration
2009" Always on time"
Restoration story by Dave Margison
Got a few Mokes to restore to roadworthy condition so I decided to get stuck into the easiest to do first. It was rust free. Many of you may cringe when I declare that I am not a back-to-the-original-look enthusiast. The Mokes I restore will be sold to the average Joe (or Jane) Blow who I am sure will not know or be worried about its originality only that it should look super and go super. Having said that the Moke I will restore to keep for myself will be as original as possible. It's a 1967 little wheeler with original duco and 'deckchair' seats already in situ. So my restoration project numerouno was an ex-Australian Army 1975 Standard Moke with a very professionally made hardtop. In 2007 I purchased it off a Japanese lady who was driving it around even though its exhaust was emitting an unbelievable amount of white smoke.
Not having the tackle to deal with this myself I gave the Moke to my friend Mark, owner of Aardvark with Mokes since he was knee high to a grasshopper. He'd had it a few weeks so when I phoned him to see how it was going Mark said "I'm bit reluctant to make a start on it at the moment it's just too handy at this time of the year. I only have to runthe engine for a few minutes and my workshop is mosquito free". At the end of the mosquito season the engine was taken out and was found to be a 1098cc with only 3 cylinders because one couldn't really be described as a cylinder. All pistons were replaced and cylinders rebored and a new clutch plate was fitted and it was my turn to have a go at it. For easy identification I have named all my Mokes.
The Japanese lady had bought the Moke off the owner of a jewellery shop that also sold watches. The Moke was adorned with 'Breitling' stickers and the spare wheel was held on with an aluminium plate depicting a huge 'Breitling' wrist watch. So the name 'Clockon' seemed appropriate and 'Clockon' was now under my deck away from the weather and awaiting my attention. The stickers were a bugger to get off and though I tried all the wonderful on-line remedies I still ended up with elbow grease as the main eliminator. The seats were shot. My favourite shop in Cairns is the Tip Shop, officially known as 'Buy Back'. Over the years of my weekly visits to this wonderful place I have collected oodles of paraphernalia which I am sure to find most helpful in Moke restoring and none more so than seats both single and bench. The fact that they need to fit without having to saw them down to size is of course paramount.
The two right-size categories are Bus and Plane seats and I chose two of the latter for 'Clockon'. We all know how thin the bottom of Moke seats need to be and the (Cessna?) seats I had bought from the Tip Shop ($5 each) didn't require any adjustment in this department or any other. They were spot on. The only challenge was the adjusting of a thick metal plate to be able to secure the seats to the chassis. The rest of the restoration was just minor fiddling like relocating the dip switch from the floor to the dash and areas of paintwork to touch up. Thank heavens for colour scanners that give us an exact paint-spray-can match. I replaced the polycarbonate side windows and the rear Perspex window. It was great to see through these windows once again. The speakers located in the hardtop at the rear were 100 watt so replacing the Cassette/Tuner with CD/Tuner was easy and the sound was very acceptable. October 2010. And there it was done, roadworthy and ready for sale, and sold. The Moke I am restoring next is a different ball game altogether - Stay tune
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2007 Dave Margison in Cairns has just
bought this bright yellow Moke
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